Views: 1623

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Here's a News story on sugar mills co-generation potentially adding 1500-3000 MW of electricity into Pakistan's national grid:

KARACHI: In order to take advantage of the incentives offered by the government of Pakistan and to integrate the expansion project for future mill operations, two sugar mills in Sindh have propose to implement co-generation power projects, official sources said.

Ranipur Sugar Mill and Chamber Sugar Mill have submitted their applications with the National Electric Power Regulatory Authority (Nepra) for grant of generation licence for cumulative generation of 32MW.

The Economic Coordination Committee (ECC) of the Cabinet in its meeting held on March 6, 2013, had approved the framework for power cogeneration 2013 bagasse and biomass as an addendum to the Renewable Energy Policy 2006. This framework is effective for all high pressure cogeneration projects, utilising bagasse and biomass, the officials said.

Nepra had already approved Rs10.50 per unit as the upfront tariff for power generation through sugar mills by utilising sugarcane bagasse.

According to Nepra spokesman, this upfront tariff has been approved to encourage sugar mills to generate around 1,500 megawatts on fast-track basis.

The applicants said, at present, hydel generation is costing Rs2.50 per unit, generation through natural gas is costing around Rs5 per unit, thermal generation from Rs14 to Rs18 per unit and electricity generated through diesel is costing Rs23 to Rs28 per unit.

The approval of upfront tariff for sugar mills will encourage sugar mills to plan their investment in this new sector for steering the country out of the power crisis. The government plans to generate around 3,000MW of cheaper electricity through sugarcane bagasse on fast-track basis and investors will be facilitated and encouraged, the official said.

Necessary amendments will also be made in the existing co-generation and renewable energy policies to make it simplified and investor-friendly.

Pakistan is the fifth largest producer of sugarcane with the production of 50 million tons of sugarcane annually, yielding over 10 million tons of bagasse.

Power generation from bagasse will not only reduce the furnace oil import but also save Rs33 billion to Rs49 billion worth of foreign exchange per annum.

The country has 87 sugar mills with the capacity to generate 3,000MW from bagasse in winter season.

Currently, seven sugar mills sell their surplus power to government, including Layyah Sugar Mills with an installed capacity of 9.2MW, exports 4MW; Hamza Sugar Mills operates 23.6MW plant, whereas Shakarganj Sugar Mills operates a 20MW co-generation power plant.

Al-Noor Sugar Mills generates 21.8MW and now plans to increase its capacity to 36.8MW. Rahim Yar Khan Sugar Mills generates 18MW and sells 10MW. Likewise, Al-Moiz Sugar Mills generates 27MW and exports 15MW, while JDW Sugar Mills generates 22MW with a surplus of 10MW.

http://www.thenews.com.pk/Todays-News-3-226623-Sugar-mills-opting-f...

Benoist Bazin, Head of Section, Delegation of the European Union (EU) to Pakistan on Thursday inaugurated the EU-funded 'High Pressure Cogeneration for sugar sector in Pakistan (HP Cogen-Pak)' under the EU SWITCH ASIA Programme. The programme will support the local sugar sector to upgrade towards high pressure boiler technology and enable them to export electricity to the national grid.

"This programme is focusing on providing support to the sugar sector, financial sector, technology providers and the public sector in popularising High Pressure Cogeneration Technology," said Bazin during his keynote speech at the ceremony. "The programme aims at achieving this by supporting sugar mills through technology standardisation, enabling access to finance, and mobilising relevant public sector authorities.

Given the background of electricity supply constraint that Pakistan is facing these days, Bazin added that promotion of High Pressure Cogeneration would promote not only energy security of Pakistan, but also generate electricity from renewable fuels.

Highlighting the various activities, Omar Malik, Project Director of HP Cogen-Pak project informed the participants that the project was currently working with 35 sugar mills, 14 financial institutions and five technology providers. Seven bankable feasibility studies are already underway. Need assessment of financial sector is in the pipeline while capacity building of Pakistani boiler manufactures is also expected to start in December 2014.

The event was attended by representatives of Ministry of Water and Power, National Electric Power Regulatory Authority, Private Power Infrastructure Board, Alternative Energy Development Board, State Bank of Pakistan, Climate Change Division, Pakistani boiler manufacturers and sugar mill representatives.

http://www.brecorder.com/agriculture-a-allied/183/1238159/

Global Renewable Energy Mapping Program Gets Underway in Pakistan with First Solar Measurement Station

The first of nine automated solar measuring stations in Pakistan was inaugurated at the Quaid-e-Azam Solar Park in Bahawalpur in October 2014
The nine stations will transmit daily reports on 10 minute average values for solar radiation levels, temperature, air pressure and wind speed, with the data made publicly available
Installation will soon be followed by 15 wind measurement stations in Pakistan, and similar measurement campaigns in eleven other countries

Pakistan has tremendous potential for harnessing wind, solar, biomass and other renewable energy resources to help reduce power cuts and improve access to modern energy services. But the country lacks the high quality resource data at a national scale that is needed to take full advantage of these sources of clean energy.

For the past year, the World Bank and Pakistan’s Alternative Energy Development Board have been working together to map renewable energy resources across the entire country. The project, supported by the World Bank’s Energy Sector Management Assistance Program (ESMAP), will measure Pakistan’s potential for wind, solar and biomass energy by using ground-based data collection, GIS analysis, and geospatial planning. It is part of a broader Renewable Energy Resource Mapping initiative covering 12 countries.

Concluding the first phase of the project, initial maps of solar and wind potential for Pakistan were presented to the government and other stakeholders at an October 15 workshop in Islamabad. The result of months of computer-intensive modeling, these maps represent a significant improvement over previous efforts due to computational advances over the last decade. The maps are based on satellite data and global atmospheric models covering a 10 year period, and can be used to estimate the likely solar or wind potential at any point in the country.

However, to get to the level of confidence required by commercial developers, these modeling results must be compared against actual solar and wind measurements taken from ground-based stations.

A major part of the ESMAP renewable energy mapping initiative is to collect ground-based measurement data for a period of up to two years. This data is then used to improve the models, leading to the production of solar and wind atlases with a margin of error of as low as 5 percent. These in turn can be used by governments to set tariffs and guide the strategic development of renewable energy, and by commercial developers to carry out feasibility studies, leading to development of solar and wind power plants.

http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2014/11/12/global-wbg-rene...

Half of all new #Energy world-wide last year was Green. #Solar #Wind http://www.juancole.com/2015/04/energy-world-green.html

Prepared by the Frankfurt School-UNEP Collaborating Centre and Bloomberg New Energy Finance, the report says that a continuing sharp decline in technology costs – particularly in solar but also in wind – means that every dollar invested in renewable energy bought significantly more generating capacity in 2014.
In what was called “a year of eye-catching steps forward for renewable energy”, the report notes that wind, solar, biomass and waste-to-power, geothermal, small hydro and marine power contributed an estimated 9.1 percent of world electricity generation in 2014, up from 8.5 percent in 2013.
This, says the report, means that the world’s electricity systems emitted 1.3 gigatonnes of CO2 – roughly twice the emissions of the world’s airline industry – less than it would have if that 9.1 percent had been produced by the same fossil-dominated mix generating the other 90.9 percent of world power.
“Once again in 2014, renewables made up nearly half of the net power capacity added worldwide,” said Achim Steiner, Executive Director of UNEP. “These climate-friendly energy technologies are now an indispensable component of the global energy mix and their importance will only increase as markets mature, technology prices continue to fall and the need to rein in carbon emissions becomes ever more urgent.”
China saw by far the biggest renewable energy investments last year – a record 83.3 billion dollars, up 39 percent from 2013. The United States was second at 38.3 billion dollars, up seven percent on the year (although below its all-time high reached in 2011). Third came Japan at 35.7 billion dollars, 10 percent higher than in 2013 and its biggest total ever.
According to the report, a prominent feature of 2014 was the rapid expansion of renewables into new markets in developing countries, where investments jumped 36 percent to 131.3 billion dollars. China with 83.3 billion, Brazil (7.6 billion), India (7.4 billion) and South Africa (5.5 billion) were all in the top 10 investing countries, while more than one billion dollars was invested in Indonesia, Chile, Mexico, Kenya and Turkey.

Net metering law comes into effect in #Pakistan for #solarpanels up to 1MW | PV-Tech. #renewables http://www.pv-tech.org/news/net_metering_law_comes_into_effect_in_p...

Pakistan’s energy regulator, NEPRA (National Electric Power Regulatory Authority), has approved and put into effect net metering schemes for solar and wind generation of up to 1MW.

The plans were drafted in October 2014 and approved at government level as far back as January of this year. NEPRA made its announcement last week that it was “pleased” to announce what it called a “framework for the regulation of Distributed Generation by using alternative and renewable energy net metering”. The issue of the notification on 1 September put the new scheme into force immediately.

NEPRA will grant generation licences to solar and wind system owners, who will need to register the critical equipment used - the maker and model of inverter and generator being the key components in this regard. Among other technical considerations, the generator must also install a manual disconnect device to take the system off the network if necessary.

Distributed generators that sign up to the scheme must pay a one-off fee to NEPRA. The charges range from PKR500 (US$4.80) for systems between 20kW and 50kW, and up to PKR5,000 for systems of 100kW to 1,000kW, although those of 20kW capacity or below will be exempted.

The scheme also outlines the process under which both would-be generators and distribution companies must operate, including the timeline for approvals. Applicants should receive acknowledgement of receipt from distribution companies within five days of sending in their forms, unless the application form has been filled inadequately, in which case applicants will hear back within seven days. Following that, the distribution company will carry out a technical review – the only part of the process for which an indeterminate time frame is allowed – before replying within three days if connection is not feasible, or within seven working days if approval has been met.

International law firm Eversheds has described Pakistan as “one of the most exciting renewables markets globally, with an abundance of potential”. Last week Eversheds held an event in London with the International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group, where Pakistani government officials and experts discussed the country's renewable energy programmes,

"Pakistan’s renewable market is relatively new but it provides an attractive investment opportunity with compelling structures which make it bankable as well as marketable," Alternative Energy Development Board (AEDB) of Pakistan's CEO, Amjad Ali Awansaid said at the event.

"The government has a shared vision and a commitment to developing a clean energy regime. It is supporting investors and developers through various incentives and has removed certain challenges such as making land accessible and aligning project development with grid capacity."

The country has introduced feed-in tariffs (FiTs) for larger systems, leading to companies such as Switzerland’s Meeco to carry out a number of commercial rooftop installations under power purchase agreements (PPAs). Meanwhile aleo Solar, headquartered in Germany but owned by Taiwanese company Sunrise Global Energy, kicked off its involvement in Pakistan in March by providing PV modules to 18 solar systems of 100kWp capacity each in rural areas where diesel is still one of the main sources of fuel. The aleo Solar systems will be linked to energy storage to maximise the use of solar. Similarly, last month meteocontrol China, a subsidiary of Shunfeng International Clean Energy said it would add integrated remote control systems to 100MW of a larger 900MW project in Punjab. The move to add net metering is hoped to add momentum to the residential and smaller scale markets.

Informative article Sir. but video is not playing.?

Government Jobs in Pakistan

RSS

Pre-Paid Legal


Twitter Feed

    follow me on Twitter

    Sponsored Links

    South Asia Investor Review
    Investor Information Blog

    Haq's Musings
    Riaz Haq's Current Affairs Blog

    Please Bookmark This Page!




    Blog Posts

    Misery Index: Who's Less Miserable? India or Pakistan?

    Pakistanis are less miserable than Indians in the economic sphere, according to the Hanke Annual Misery Index (HAMI) published in early 2021 by Professor Steve Hanke. With India ranked 49th worst and Pakistan ranked 39th worst, both countries find themselves among the most miserable third of the 156 nations ranked. Hanke teaches Applied Economics at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. Hanke explains it as follows: "In the economic sphere, misery tends to flow from high…

    Continue

    Posted by Riaz Haq on November 21, 2021 at 1:30pm — 7 Comments

    Musharraf Era Textile Boom Returning to Pakistan?

    Pakistan textile industry is booming with exports soaring 27% to more than $6 billion in the first four months (July-October) of the current fiscal year. “We believe that $5 billion investment (in textile industry) in the Musharraf era would be matched in the next six to eight months”  says Zubair Motiwala, a leading textile industrialist and chairman of Businessmen Group (BMG), as quoted in the Pakistani …

    Continue

    Posted by Riaz Haq on November 17, 2021 at 9:00pm — 11 Comments

    © 2021   Created by Riaz Haq.   Powered by

    Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service