Pakistanis Second Fastest Growing Group Among Asian-Americans

There are now more Asians migrating to the United States than Hispanics,  reflecting a  decline in illegal
immigration as American employers increase their demand for
high-skilled workers. About 430,000 Asians, or 36 percent of all new immigrants, arrived in
the U.S. in 2010, according to the latest census data. That's higher than 370,000, or 31 percent, who were Hispanic.




A study published by the Pew Research Center details what it describes as "the rise of Asian-Americans",  a
highly diverse and fast-growing group making up roughly 5 percent of the
U.S. population. Mostly foreign-born and naturalized citizens, their
numbers have been boosted by increases in visas granted to specialized
workers and to wealthy investors as the U.S. economy becomes driven less
by manufacturing and more by technology.

 The Pew survey is based on an analysis of census data as well as
interviews with 3,511 Asian adults living in the U.S., conducted by cell
phone or landline from Jan. 3 to March 27. The poll has a margin of
error of plus or minus 2.4 percentage points for all respondents, higher
for subgroups.


Pakistani-Americans (pop: 409,163) are the seventh largest community among Asian-Americans, behind Chinese (3.8 million),  Filipinos (3.4 million), Indians (3.2 million), Vietnamese (1.74 million),  Koreans (1.7 million) and Japanese (1.3 million), according to Asian-American Center For Advancing Justice . They are still a miniscule fraction of the overall US population. However, their numbers have more than doubled in the last decade due to increased immigration, according to US Census 2010 data. With 100% increase since 2000, Pakistanis are the second fastest growing Asian immigrant group in the United States. With median household income of $63,000, Pakistani-Americans also earn more than an average American household. The most common jobs of Pakistani-Americans include doctors, engineers, 
accountants, salespersons, administrators/managers and financial analysts, and 55 per cent hold at least a
bachelor’s degree which is higher than 49% of all Asian-Americans and almost twice the 28% of overall American population with college degrees.



Here are some of the highlights of Pakistani-American data from US Census 2010 as gleaned from a report titled "A Community of Contrasts Asian Americans in the United States: 2011" published by Asian-American Center For Advancing Justice:

1. There are 409,163 Pakistani-Americans in 2010, the 7th largest Asian-American community in America.

2. Pakistani-American population doubled from 2000 (204,309) to 2010 (409,163), the second largest percentage increase after Bangladeshis' 157% increase in the same period.

3.  The median household income of Pakistani-American families is nearly
$63,000 versus $51,369 average for all Americans.

4. 55% of Pakistanis have a bachelor's degree or higher.

5. 55% of Pakistanis own their own homes.

6. 6% of Pakistani-American population is mixed race.

7. 65% of Pakistanis in America are foreign-born. 57% of foreign-born Pakistani-American population is made up of naturalized citizens.

8. There are 120,000 Pakistani legal permanent residents of which 42% are eligible to naturalize.

9. There were 69,202 immigrant visas issued to Pakistanis from 2001 to 2010, the 5th highest among Asian nations.

10. 28% of Pakistanis have limited English proficiency.

11. 15% of Pakistanis are classified as poor; only 1% of them are on public assistance.

12. 8% of Pakistanis are unemployed, a figure lower than the general population of Americans.


13. Median age of Pakistanis in America is only 29 years, lower than most of the Asian groups and the national median age of 36.8 years.

Pakistani-American community is still relatively young when compared with other immigrant groups. More of the Pakistanis in America are college educated than the general population of whites and various immigrant groups. The youthful energy and higher education levels of Pakistani-Americans are opening doors for them to rise and shine in America, in spite of the current economic difficulties in their adopted land of opportunities.

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Views: 659

Comment by Riaz Haq on February 10, 2019 at 10:43am

Upscale Pakistani-American restaurant near the White House in WashingtonDC feeds the poor and homeless every single day . Served 16,000 free meals in 2018| WJLA

Sakina Halal Grill looks like your typical high-end restaurant located just blocks from the White House. During the lunchtime rush hour, many customers flock to the grill for the all you can eat buffet of authentic Pakistani Indian food.

However, it's anything but just another restaurant.

Beyond the delicious flavors you find, the warm Chai Latte or fresh lemon water, you would never know that homeless people are walking in and out to experience the same thing paying customers are.

https://youtu.be/GIHVwDlJUQ8

Comment by Riaz Haq on November 29, 2020 at 11:53am

Four years ago, Maliha Javed, an immigrant from Pakistan, was not paying attention to politics. A community college student in suburban Atlanta, she was busy paying for books and studying for classes. She did not vote that year.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/25/us/georgia-asian-american-voters...

But the past four years changed her. The Trump administration’s Muslim travel ban affected some of her friends. The child separation policy reminded her of living apart from her parents for three years during her own move to the United States. Then, this summer, the discovery that she was pregnant made it final: On Election Day, she marched into the Amazing Grace Lutheran Church near her house and voted for the first time in her life. She chose Joseph R. Biden Jr.

“I want it to be a better country for him to grow up in,” said Ms. Javed, who is 24 and is having a boy.

Ms. Javed is part of a small but powerful new force in Georgia politics: Asian-American voters. She lives in Gwinnett County, Georgia’s second-most populous county and the one with the largest Asian-American population. Mr. Biden, who narrowly defeated President Trump in Georgia, won Gwinnett County by 18 percentage points, a substantial increase over Hillary Clinton’s performance four years ago and only the second time the county went blue since the 1970s.

----------------
https://www.abc12.com/2020/11/07/muslim-vote-helps-secure-michigan-...

- Roughly 146,000 votes give now President-elect Joe Biden the edge over President Donald Trump in the Great Lakes State. That margin was even tighter in 2016 when Trump carried Michigan with 10,700 more votes than Hillary Clinton.

By and large, the tight margins of victory in certain states for either candidate highlight how critical every vote is, and perhaps more importantly, the hard work of expanding the electorate. Muslim civic engagement nonprofit Emgage Michigan did just that for the Biden/Harris ticket in 2020, according to the organization’s executive director.

“I want everyone to know that Muslims played a huge role for Biden to win Michigan and the nation itself," said Nada Al-Hanooti, Executive Director of Emgage Michigan.

Al-Hanooti says their efforts resulted in 80,000 absentee and early votes from Muslims. The exact number of Muslim votes cast in Michigan isn’t something that is officially known yet.

She says the president’s ban on visitors from predominantly Muslim countries played a major factor for Muslim families, among other serious social issues. Biden pledged to end the ban on day one if elected.

Comment by Riaz Haq on January 25, 2021 at 7:52am

Pakistani-Americans in Biden Administration as of 1/25/21:

Ali Zaidi, Deputy Climate Change Advisor in the White House

Salman Ahmad, Director of Policy Planning in US State Department

Saima Mohsin. US Attorney in Detroit, MI in Department of Justice (DOJ)

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