India Loves Pakistan Tandoori Meat

"When Delhi's Press Club organised an evening of Pakistani food and music, flying in chefs from Islamabad, the racks of richly-spiced meat on the grill quickly ran out as hundreds of Indian journalists brought their families, equipped with "tiffin" boxes to take away extra supplies"  BBC Report 26 June 2014

The BBC story highlights the fact that the vegetarian India demonstrates its deep love of the exquisite taste of Pakistan's meat dishes whenever the opportunity presents itself.  To further illustrate the phenomenon, let me share with my readers how two famous Indians see meat-loving Pakistan:

Sachin Tendulkar:

 The senior cricketer...said he gorged on Pakistani food and had piled on a few kilos on his debut tour there. "The first tour of Pakistan was a memorable one. I used to have a heavy breakfast which was keema paratha and then have a glass of lassi and then think of dinner. After practice sessions there was no lunch because it was heavy but also at the same time delicious. I wouldn't think of having lunch or snack in the afternoon. I was only 16 and I was growing," Tendulkar recalled. "It was a phenomenal experience, because when I got back to Mumbai and got on the weighing scale I couldn't believe myself. But whenever we have been to Pakistan, the food has been delicious. It is tasty and I have to be careful for putting on weight," he said.

Source: Press Trust of India November 2, 2012

 Hindol Sengupta:

Yes, that's right. The meat. There always, always seems to be meat in every meal, everywhere in Pakistan. Every where you go, everyone you know is eating meat. From India, with its profusion of vegetarian food, it seems like a glimpse of the other world. The bazaars of Lahore are full of meat of every type and form and shape and size and in Karachi, I have eaten some of the tastiest rolls ever. For a Bengali committed to his non-vegetarianism, this is paradise regained. Also, the quality of meat always seems better, fresher, fatter, more succulent, more seductive, and somehow more tantalizingly carnal in Pakistan. I have a curious relationship with meat in Pakistan. It always inevitably makes me ill but I cannot seem to stop eating it. From the halimto the payato the nihari, it is always irresistible and sends shock shivers to the body unaccustomed to such rich food. How the Pakistanis eat such food day after day is an eternal mystery but truly you have not eaten well until you have eaten in Lahore!

Source: The Hindu August 7, 2010

Silicon Valley Indians:

I personally see vivid proof of how much Indians love Pakistani food every time I go to Pakistan restaurants serving chicken tikka, seekh kabab, biryani and nihari in Silicon Valley, California. Among the Pakistani restaurants most frequented by Indians are Shalimar, Pakwan and Shan. These restaurants are also very popular with white Americans and East Asians in addition to other ethnic groups including Afghans, Middle Easterners and South Asians.

Carnivorous Pakistanis: 

A recent study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and Nature magazine reported that Pakistanis are among the most carnivorous people in the world.

The scientists conducting the study  used "trophic levels" to place people in the food chain. The trophic system puts algae which makes its own food at level 1. Rabbits that eat plants are level 2 and foxes that eat herbivores are 3. Cod, which eats other fish, is level four, and top predators, such as polar bears and orcas, are up at 5.5 - the highest on the scale.

Trophic Levels Map Source: Nature Magazine

After studying the eating habits of 176 countries, the authors found that average human being is at 2.21 trophic level. It put Pakistanis at 2.4, the same trophic level as Europeans and Americans. China and India are at 2.1 and 2.2 respectively.

Source: Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences

The countries with the highest trophic levels (most carnivorous people) include Mongolia, Sweden and Finland, which have levels of 2.5, and the whole of Western Europe, USA, Australia, Argentina, Sudan, Mauritania, Kazakhstan, Pakistan and Turkmenistan, which all have a level of 2.4.

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) also published recent report on the subject of meat consumption. It found that meat consumption in developing countries is increasing with rising incomes. USDA projects an average 2.4 percent annual increase in developing countries compared with 0.9 percent in developed countries. Per capita poultry meat consumption in developing countries is projected to rise 2.8 percent per year during 2013-22, much faster than that of pork (2.2 percent) and beef (1.9 percent).

Summary:

Although meat consumption in Pakistan is rising, it still remains very low by world standards. At just 18 Kg per person, it's less than half of the world average of 42 Kg per capita meat consumption reported by the FAO.

While Pakistanis are the most carnivorous people among South Asians, their love of meat is spreading to India with its rising middle class incomes.  Being mostly vegetarian, neighboring Indians consume only 3.2 Kg of meat per capita, less than one-fifth of Pakistan's 18 Kg. Daal (legumes or pulses) are popular in South Asia as a protein source.  Indians consume 11.68 Kg of daal per capita, about twice as much as Pakistan's 6.57 Kg.

India and China with the rising incomes of their billion-plus populations are expected to be the main drivers of the worldwide demand for meat and poultry in the future.

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Comment by Riaz Haq on June 19, 2016 at 7:32am

An Overview of Poultry Industry in Pakistan by J. HUSSAIN, RABBANI, S. ASLAM and H.A. AHMAD:


Pakistan industry still attained 127% growth in the total number of birds produced, 126% growth in the total meat production and 71%growth in terms of total eggs produced between 2000 and 2010 (GOP, 2013). The reason behind this extraordinary growth is the existence of the strong base of this industry inPakistan. Presently the cheapest available sources of animal protein in Pakistan are the eggs and meat from the poultry sector (PPA, 2013a). 


Despite showing excellent potential and growth over the years, per capita availability of poultry meat in Pakistan is still 5 kg and 51 eggs per year, compared to developed countries where these figures are 41 kg meat and 300 eggs (PPA, 2013b). According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the average daily requirement for animal protein is 27 g per person, whereas in Pakistan it is only 17 g (Memon, 2012). Out of this 17 g,the share of proteins from poultry is just 5 g, causing a gap of 10 g per person per day. If calculated on an annual basis, bearing in mind the present population of Pakistan (180million), this gap is 788,000 t of meat. In the national meat pool the share of beef and mutton is either constant or decreasing steadily and the poultry sector has the potential tofill this gap


Poultry production has increased its share steadily in the total meat pool of the country(Figure 5). In 1971, the market share of beef was 61%, mutton was 37%, and poultry meat a mere 2-2.5% (GOP, 2013). In 2010 the market share of poultry meat had increased to 25%, whereas beef and mutton had reduced to 55% and 20%respectively (GOP, 2013). It was this dynamic increase in the overall magnitude of poultry sector that decreased the gap between the supply and demand of animal proteins in Pakistan, and also assisted in stabilising beef and mutton prices, making meat affordable to most of the Pakistani population.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/285673061_An_overview_of_p...

Comment by Riaz Haq on June 19, 2016 at 9:34am

Pulse (Daal) crops in Pakistan:

Understanding the importance of pulses United Nations ‘s(UN) 68th General Assembly declared “2016” as “International Year of Pulses”.

Pulses are cultivated all over the world but in Pakistan it is being cultivated on 5% of total cultivated area of crops and chickpea,black gram,mung bean.pigeon pea, mash,masoor and few others are grown.

In Pakistan pulses are grown on 1.5 million hectors of land. Chickpea play a vital role in country’s pulses production as it is cultivated on 73% of the total area occupied by pulses cultivation and its contribution to the total pulses production is 76% while mash and masoor consumes 2%( each )of

area under pulses cultivation and share 1.4% in total pulses production.

Mung Bean an easily digestible item is one of the important pulse crop of Pakistan, it is mainly grown in southern parts of Punjab and Sindh. Punjab alone provides 88% area for its cultivation and share 85% in its total production in the country.

On an average every Pakistani consumes 6-7 kg of pulses annually which shows the interest of Pakistani people in pulses which is increasing demand and supply gap as Pakistan doesn’t have enough domestic production to meet the requirement of its country men, its domestic production of pulses was 0.45 million tonnes in 2014 which was 0.75 million tonns in 2013 much lower than demand.

Pakistan spent $139.096 million of foreign exchange in the fiscal year 2010-2011 to meet the domestic requirements of pulses by importing 628.508 thousand tonnes of pulses. 444.7776 thousand tonnes were imported during 2009-2010 according to available reports, these reports show increasing import trend as country spent $224.135 million in July2014-january 2015 and imported 370,181 metric tonns compared to $165.160 million in July2013-January2014 and imported volume of 262,509 metric tonnes, Country’s import volume of pulses was raised by 32.41 % as 63,130 metric tonnes were imported in January 2015 compared to 47,679 metric tonnes in same period of 2014.

Pakistan is mainly depended on Canada,Australia,Burma,Tanzania,Euthiopia to full fill the domestic requirement of pulses which is about 0.6 metric tonnes every year.

Major challenges faced by pulses sector in Pakistan are, farmers get lower prices for their outputs due to this farmers are switching to another crops for their bread and butter, role of middle men, lack of modern technology, machinery ,improper harvesting, improper sowing,delay or early sowing of seeds, non certified seeds, less resistant varieties of pulses, lack of interest of Government or improper Government policies and lack of research on pulses to increase productions. if work is done on these issues Pakistan will be able to produce and full fill domestic needs and it will also create more employment opportunities where other cash crops cant be grown.

http://www.agricorner.com/status-of-pulses-crops-in-pakistan/

Comment by Riaz Haq on January 12, 2017 at 9:33am
#Halal Guys eatery coming to #SanFrancisco Bay Area with first outlet at Union Square. @BayAreaMuslims http://insidescoopsf.sfgate.com/blog/2017/01/11/san-franciscos-firs... The Halal Guys, New York City’s immensely popular street eats brand, will officially open its first brick-and-mortar in San Francisco on Jan. 27.
 
The new spot, located at 340 O’Farrell St. in the old Naan N Curry, will be the first step in what’s a miniature Bay Area takeover for the East Coast food cart. (They have plans for another spot in Berkeley). Right now, the Halal Guys have 200 locations in development across the U.S., Canada and Southeast Asia.
 
We’ve been following the news of Halal Guys setting up shop in the Bay Area for the last few months now. This latest update means they’re less than a month from dishing out those renowned chicken gyros or falafel between Taylor and Mason streets for both Union Square and Tenderloin audiences.
 
Stay tuned for more coverage.
 
Halal Guys: 340 O’Farrell St., Sunday through Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 2 a.m. and Thursday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 a.m.
Comment by Riaz Haq on January 4, 2019 at 4:45pm

Michelin-starred #restaurant. New Punjab Club was awarded a Michelin Star, just 18 months after it opened its doors in one of Hong Kong’s prime localities. https://images.dawn.com/news/1181591



33-year-old Syed Asim Hussain recently become the youngest restaurateur in the world to hold two Michelin stars.

In December, his ambitious and extremely personal Pakistani restaurant New Punjab Club was awarded a Michelin Star, just 18 months after it opened its doors in one of Hong Kong’s prime localities.

With this, the New Punjab Club is also the first Pakistani restaurant in the world with a Michelin Star. Hussain’s other Michelin honour has been awarded for his French bistro, Belon.



Hussain shared his excitement about the Michelin honour with Images in an exclusive chat over the phone from Hong Kong, "I feel very proud to have received two stars this year. I sort of expected it for the French restaurant, but to have the New Punjab Club recognised so early on is exciting.

Hussain continues, "It’s the first Pakistani restaurant to have a Michelin Star, and I was just telling my team that we have to make sure it stays. Initially, I was convinced someone was pranking us, or we got a call by mistake. I didn’t believe it until the morning of the awards. It was a cool honour for me personally as well. In some ways, it belongs to my father also, for the work he was doing with his restaurants in the ‘80s and ‘90s in Hong Kong. Still talking about it gives me chills; it sure is hard to believe.”

The New Punjab Club and Belon are just two of the 22 restaurants under the Black Sheep Restaurants umbrella that Hussain co-founded with his business partner, Christopher Mark, in 2012.

Hussain was born in Hong Kong, but spent his formative years in Pakistan when his father, businessman and diplomat Syed Pervaiz Hussain, sent him - at age five - and his six-year-old brother off to boarding school at Lahore’s Aitchison College.



“The key element in the story of the New Punjab Club is nostalgia, of which Aitchison is a very big part of. Everyone at the restaurant knows about the school; they’ve seen pictures. My Aitchison stories have now become their Aitchison stories. So, the 13-14 years I spent there, have helped create the New Punjab Club. The essence that comes from Aitchison is very aristocratic and regal. As a kid, I also spent a lot of time at the Punjab Club in Lahore, which is why I affectionately named the restaurant after it.”

Before opening up the restaurant, the duo already had 15 restaurants to their credit under their group. Yet, Hussain says it wasn’t easy convincing Chris to open up a restaurant that serves Pakistani and Indian cuisine. “Pakistani cuisine is white-labelled all over the world as Indian food. I had been talking to [Chris] about this and had a hard time convincing him. So, I took him to Lahore in 2016, and in a week I showed him around Aitchison, Punjab Club, Gowalmandi, Lakshmi Chowk and even Cocoo’s. I was trying to make him look at this the way I did, to show him that we could build a story around this.”

The research and convincing didn’t end at Lahore. “We then went to London. The city has neighbourhoods that have great Pakistani food, which is not white-labelled as Indian food. We saw great modern Indian restaurants like the renowned Gymkhana, Dishoom, and Indian Accent among many others. This was all part of my attempt to convince him that we could do this - we would tell an original, interesting and sellable story.”

The duo was lucky, and got Chef Palash Mitra, of London’s Gymkhana on board for the restaurant. In Hussain’s words, “Mitra is one of the best South Asian chefs in the world.”

Hussain talked about the hurdles they faced during menu development, “We couldn’t get the seekh kabab right; they weren’t the same as they are in Main Market, Lahore. I then realised the issue was that the diameter of the seekh in Lahore is larger than that in India. So, I got some seekhs from Lahore just for this.”



The young restaurateur is proud to have created a mixed essence of both his school and his hometown in his restaurant. “One special thing about the New Punjab Club is that it isn’t modern, it’s traditional. My father belongs to the generation that doesn’t throw anything away. When his restaurants shut down, they stored everything; including the tandoors he had brought from Pakistan. So I took those out, restored them, and have been using them here. The essence of Punjabi cuisine is in the tandoor, so anything that comes out of it, is the star of the show among the customers, be it protein or kababs.”

But the New Punjab Club isn’t easy to get into. It is a high-end, premium restaurant that, in Hussain’s own words, costs a person $100 on average. It is also almost impossible to get a table there, he says.

Another interesting aspect of the restaurant is the fact that the paintings displayed are works of some of the biggest artists of the South Asian region, from the legendary Saeed Akhtar to AS Rind and Mughees Riaz, to name a few. And all of these paintings come from Hussain’s personal collection. “The restaurant represents Pakistan, post-liberation. There is a whole theme to it that is regal and aristocratic. Waiters wear beautiful safari suits in the summer and short sherwanis in winter. I got them designed exclusively by Bareeze. When you walk through the doors, you’ll feel you’re not in modern day Hong Kong, but transported to some other place, in another time,” Hussain says, dissecting the ambiance.

Hussain is part of the fourth generation of his family in Hong Kong, that has been there for about a 100 years. His great-grandfather moved to Hong Kong after World War I. “My father was raised in Hong Kong. His first language is Cantonese, which he speaks better than Urdu and Punjabi, or even English. He had a burning desire to send his children to Pakistan. Today, looking back, they had correctly felt that we would lose our connection to Pakistan.”

Hussain appears to be a hardcore Lahori at heart. “Lahore is in my blood. If you meet me in Hong Kong and ask where I’m from, I’ll say Lahore.”



Sharing fond memories of Lahore and his school, Hussain remembers himself to, although do well in school, also be a naughty boy. “I got into a lot of trouble too. I remember running away when I was in class 7 or 8, to go to the zoo, Lakshmi Chowk to eat takatak, and even Cocoo’s Den with friends on foggy winter nights in A-levels. I would also go out to get qeemay-wali naan from somewhere on The Mall Road. All these things in some shape or form are represented in the New Punjab Club. Lahore is a big part of my identity, who I am, and what I do. In a lot of ways, the restaurant should have been the first to have opened up when I started Black Sheep Restaurants six years ago. But its story is so personal and important to me, that maybe back then, I didn’t have the confidence. It’s like a filmmaker making a personal film, or a writer telling a personal story. Maybe I needed the confidence to tell the story,” he reminisces.

After finishing school, Hussain went to Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh to study finance. After graduating in 2007, he says he wasn’t sure about what he wanted to do.

“Everyone else was working at an investment bank, so thought I should do too. I moved to New York, picked up a job and lived there for five years. But the pull to move back to Hong Kong started getting stronger and stronger.”

A serial entrepreneur, his father owned a restaurant called The Mughal Room, which remained very popular with the Hong Kong elite through the ‘80s and ‘90s. “I grew up in and around the restaurant. Every summer, my brother and I would go back to Hong Kong from Aitchison and work at the restaurant. This went on until I was 17. So, if I look back the seed was planted then,” Hussain explains how and when he found out he wanted to open his own restaurant one day.

“My father did okay, but I saw him struggling with his restaurants; he wasn’t doing well. This is, in some way, me picking up from where he left off, putting right his wrongs. I know, in some way it’s a continuation of the story he was trying to tell in Hong Kong in the ‘80s and ‘90s. In fact, on the New Punjab Club menu, one of the dishes is affectionately named after his restaurant. I’ve called it ‘The Mughal Room Makhani.’”

Finally having had enough of his investment banking job in New York, Hussain quit and returned to Hong Kong in 2010, with a burning desire to work in a restaurant and to pick up where his father had left off. This led to a two-year apprenticeship with a prominent restaurant group, which as compared to his finance job, he found difficult and humbling. “I was 26 at that time. It was challenging, difficult and scary, but deep down, I knew this is what I wanted to do, that this is where I belong. This is also where I met my business partner Chris, who was group chef for that group of restaurants. We talked about what we both wanted to do and I thought we had similar ideas. And rest, as they say, is history.”



Since the New Punjab Club opened its doors 18 months ago, Hussain and Chris have opened up six more eateries. Running 22 restaurants in only six years is no mean feat, but Hussain derived the motivation from his love for food, art and storytelling. “When you’re small, the goal is survival. The idea was always to bring personal stories to life. I think a lot of our restaurants are extensions of us as people, inspired by our travels, childhood memories, incidents, people, or a particular time in history. I look at these restaurants as story books; I almost have an abstract romantic view of how restaurants are created, I look at them as art pieces.”

With both father and son having experience with restaurants, one wonders why the father failed, and what the son has that the father didn’t. “We both have doggedness. You knock me down 10 times and I’ll get up 10 times. My father was a hard-worker and I learnt a lot from him, but he didn’t have mystique, magic, nostalgia and romance. That’s how I look at restaurants.”

Hussain claims to be a big foodie himself, of course, and says; even if he wasn’t running so many restaurants he’d still be travelling for food and trying out various cuisines. However, he has a hard time choosing what his favourite type of food is. “I travel a lot and eat everything. But the food at the New Punjab Club is very nostalgic. They say food memory is emotional, so that is what it is for me. It reminds me of Lahore, Aitchison, being a teen in Pakistan in the ‘90s. I’m a big eater and love eating. I always come back to Pakistani food.”

Besides running his string of restaurants and planning new ones, Hussain tries to play sports in the little time he gets in between. “I played a lot of sports since Aitchison, and music is also a big part of who I am, but this is mostly everything. I would be lying if I said I had other passions that I pursue.”

The future for his Black Sheep Restaurants looks bright, but Hussain still has no plans to come up with something in Lahore, or Pakistan. They recently opened up their first restaurant outside Hong Kong, in Shanghai, back in the summer. Their next stop is Paris. “I’m not sure about Pakistan. If we do something there, it’ll be something more ambitious than a restaurant. I have other compelling ideas for Lahore, Pakistan, in the hospitality business, something more ambitious.”

Comment by Riaz Haq on January 23, 2020 at 7:48pm

#Curry’s Journey From #Pakistan to the #Caribbean : Trace curry's journey around the world. Curry originated as early as 2500 BCE in what is modern-day Pakistan. It has since evolved into a truly global food. | CNN Travel


https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/curry-origins-history/index.html


In 2019, ubiquitous Japanese curry house chain CoCo Ichibanya restaurant announced plans to bring its popular "curry rice" to India in 2020.

It might seem counter-intuitive to eat CoCo Ichibanya's relatively mild, sweet Japanese dish in the land of curry.
But the move underscores the sheer variety and complexity of curry -- a word that's long been misunderstood.


Curry is not a single spice, nor is it related to the namesake curry tree (though the leaves are used in many dishes in India).
The catch-all umbrella term refers to a "spiced meat, fish or vegetable stew," either freshly prepared as a powder or spice paste or purchased as a ready-made mixture," writes Colleen Sen in her book "Curry: A Global History."
According to Sen's book, the word curry most likely comes from a misunderstanding of the southern Indian word "kari," which "denoted a spiced dish of sauteed vegetables and meat."

"In the 17th century, the Portuguese [who colonized Goa in western India] took the word to mean a 'spiced stew' over rice and 'kari' eventually became 'caril' or 'caree' in Portuguese, then 'curry' in English," Sen tells CNN Travel.
Curry, which is thought to have originated as early as 2500 BCE in what is modern-day Pakistan, has since evolved into a truly global food, having traveled the world through colonization and immigration, indentured labor, trade and entrepreneurship.
Today, curry is everywhere, from chicken tikka masala in the UK to fiery green curry in Thailand, kare raisu in Japan and curry goat in Jamaica.
"I don't think there's a place in the world that doesn't have some kind of curry," says Sen.
If you're a curry lover, follow your cravings around the world by heading to these 12 destinations:

India, Japan, Jamaica, Pakistan, Thailand, Maldives, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Indonesia, South Africa, South Korea, Caribbean, UK.


Established in 1947 following the end of British colonial rule and the violent partition of India, Pakistan sees strong influences from the Mughals (a Muslim dynasty that ruled India from the early 16th to the mid-18th century) in its cuisine.
This majority Muslim country tends to prepare dishes with beef, chicken or fish as well as lots of spices, such as nutmeg, cumin, turmeric, bay leaves, cardamom and black pepper.

Curry is incredibly popular, with dozens of varieties on offer all over the country, from famous slow-cooked haleem (a stew-like dish of wheat, barley, meat, lentils and spices) to spicy karahi (made with garlic, spices, vinegar, tomatoes and onions with mutton or chicken), bitter gourd curry, saag (a spiced puree of spinach and mustard greens), chickpea curry and daal chawal, a must-try comfort food usually served with rice or roti.

The list doesn't end there: Don't miss a warming aloo gosht (meat and potato curry); hearty, rich mutton korma; lobia daal (black-eyed peas curry); and goat paya, a slow-cooked curry starring incredibly tender trotters.

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